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Medical Direction in Long-Term Care (2nd edition)
- is intended to change the way physicians and nonphysicians alike think about long term care
- covers almost 250 different topics
- is written in non-medical, non-technical language
- provides a comprehensive blueprint to help long term care facilities meet growing public, regulatory, and clinical expectations
- explains at length what OBRA really expects of the physicians in nursing facilities, and the importance of their role
- discusses in depth how effective physician practice can help a facility's operational and business success
- explains the relevance of the medical director's administrative functions to providing and improving care
- explains how administrators, physicians, nurses, and other care givers can create an effective care system
- gives regulators, surveyors, legislators, and others a comprehensible picture of long term care
- covers essentially the entire curriculum for medical directors as approved by the American Medical Directors Association (AMDA)
- is a practical, hands-on guidebook written by practitioners with considerable hands-on long term care experience
- provides almost 100 tables, figures, and forms representing letters, protocols, and ideas that the medical director can use in everyday applications
- gives a medical director hundreds of suggestions based on real-life experience for handling different aspects of the job
- can help those not providing direct care to understand long-term-care facilities and practices
- explains how the medical director can do the job in the most time- and cost-efficient fashion

This 2nd edition is a sourcebook and educational reference for attending physicians, medical directors, administrators, and other practitioners in long term care settings. Reviewers have described it as "...an outstanding contribution to a small but growing body of literature" helpful to "...anyone responsible for ensuring the quality of care in a nursing facility."

Audience: Physicians, medical directors, administrators, directors of nursing, health care administration educators, physician and other health care practitioner educators, regulatory agencies.

Contents
PART 1 : DEFINING THE CARE

Section 1: OVERVIEW OF LONG-TERM CARE
Chapter 1: Background and History of the Medical Role

Chapter 2: The Spectrum of LTC Programs and Services

Section 2: GENERAL CONCEPTS OF CLINICAL LONG-TERM CARE

Chapter 3: Goals and Objectives of LTC

Chapter 4: The Interdisciplinary Approach to Care

Chapter 5: Appropriate Medical Roles and Responsibilities

Section 3: ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ISSUES

Chapter 6: The Economics of LTC

Chapter 7: Physician Reimbursement for Care

Section 4: LAWS AND REGULATIONS CONCERNING LTC

Chapter 8: Laws and Regulations Related to the Care

Chapter 9: Other Important Legal Issues for the Medical Director

PART 2: ESTABLISHING A SYSTEM TO PROVIDE THE CARE

Section 5: The Medical Director's Roles, Functions, and Tasks

Chapter 10: A Look at Roles, Functions, and Tasks in General

Chapter 11: Organization and Management of Long-term care Facilities

Chapter 12: Steps to Establishing or Refining a Role as Medical Director

Chapter 13: Critical Leadership and Management Concepts

Section 6: Basic Medical Director Organizing, Managing, and Planning Activities

Chapter 14: Organizing the Medical Staff

Chapter 15: Overseeing Policies and Procedures

Chapter 16: Establishing and Using Committees Effectively

Chapter 17: Infection Control Roles and Responsibilities

Chapter 18: Employee Health Concepts and Programs

Chapter 19: Medical Director's Planning Roles

Chapter 20: Medical Direction in a Continuing Care Retirement Community

Section 7: General Clinical Issues

Chapter 21: Essential Systems to Deliver Quality Medical Care

Chapter 22: Effective Processes for Handling Ethical issues

Chapter 23: General Strategies for Clinical Care

Chapter 24: Constructive Management of Family Issues

Chapter 25: Medical Records and Clinical Information Management

Part 3: MONITORING AND IMPROVING THE CARE

Section 8: Quality Assurance and Improvement

Chapter 26: Relevance of Continuous Quality Improvement

Chapter 27: General Quality Assurance and Improvement Processes

Chapter 28: A Medical Quality Assurance and Improvement Program

Chapter 29: Risk Management: the Preventive Arm of QA and QI

Chapter 30: Utilization Review Activities and Functions

Section 9: Education and Training

Chapter 31: Education and Community Liaison Activities

Chapter 32: Teaching Nursing Home and Research

Part 4: RESOURCES AND REFERENCES

Chapter 33: Resources for the Medical Director and Attending Physician

A Final Word

Glossary
Reviews

"The book is tightly written, easy to read, well referenced, and efficiently indexed. . . . Practical suggestions abound, including examples of forms and letters. . . . this is an especially useful book in that it merits both a cover-to-cover read and a place at arms-length as a frequently consulted reference for the medical director, administrator, and director of nursing in long-term care. From its introduction to its 'final word' there is an integrity to the text expressed in its introduction -- that it takes knowledge, skills and adequate resources in the presence of effective processes and a guiding philosophy to yield the desired outcomes of high quality care. . . . [It is] an excellent introduction to the field of long-term care." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

". . . this is a clearly written, well organized, and comprehensive guidebook on the administrative requirements for medical directors of long-term care facilities. . . . It should be an essential reference for physicians and other clinicians who fill executive roles at long-term care facilities. . . . It may also interest physicians with institutionalized patients, helping them to work productively within the organizational needs of long-term care facilities and to understand what differentiates these settings from acute care, particularly tertiary care, institutions. " Annals of Internal Medicine